‘I hope for you to come back soon, daddy’: The heartbreaking scene at one Marine’s grave on Memorial Day during visit by son, four, who was a baby when he died

He’s wearing the full formal Dress Blue uniform of a Marine Corps sergeant, and he has medals for service in Iraq and Afghanistan pinned to his chest.

But Christian Jacobs is not a Marine. He’s just four years old, standing at the grave of his father, Sgt Christopher James Jacob, on the day when America remembers its fallen heroes.

Christian Jacobs and his mother, Brittany Jacobs, visited the grave of Sgt Christopher James Jacobs, who served one tour in Afghanistan and one in Iraq, in Arlington National Cemetery on Monday.

For Memorial Day Commemorations, they came bearing flowers, cards and photographs, and Christian had lain on the ground next to his father’s tombstone, at section 60 of the cemetery.

‘I hope for you to come back soon, daddy. And I love you and hope for you to be here. I know you will be here and I love you. And he is always watching over me and makes sure – he’s proud of me, daddy. And I love you daddy,’ Christian said.

Sgt. Jacobs died in 2011 in a training accident a Marine base in Twentynine Palms, California, when Christian was just eight months old.

‘He wants to know so much about his father. He likes coming here and he was excited about coming here. He said I get to go see my daddy, Brittany Jacobs told WBRC.

She added: ‘My daddy’s resting place is what he calls it so he was looking forward to coming out here. When he got here the first thing he did was run up and hug the stone, he didn’t want to leave it.’

Jacobs had enlisted in the Marine Corps in 2000, according to the Marine Times. During his time in the military, he received several awards including the Marine Corps Good Conduct Medal, Combat Action Ribbon, Global War on Terrorism Service Medal, Sea Service Deployment Ribbon, Iraqi Campaign Medal, National Defense Service Medal and Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal.

Just hours before his death, he texted his wife Brittany Jacobs telling her that he had slept well the night before.

‘I love you guys,’ he sent as his last words to wife and young son.

‘We love you too, baby,’ replied his wife. Since his death, Brittany Jacobs has taken her son to visit her husband’s grave in Arlington National Cemetery.

This year Christian Jacobs wore a replica Marine Corps Dress Blue uniform with his father’s medals pinned to his chest as he and his mother made their way to the tombstone at section 60 of Arlington National Cemetery.

Thousands of people gathered at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday to commemorate the lives of fallen military men and women.

As part of Memorial Day services, flowers and flags were places on rows and rows of graves as loving friends and families remember those who have died.

President Barack Obama joined the families at the cemetery to take place in the annual wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

He then gave a speech in front of the crowd at Arlington National Cemetery.

‘Honor, courage, selflessness, those values lived in the hearts of everyday heroes who fought for us in every American war,’ he said.

He continued: ‘This is not only a resting ground for national heroes, but it’s a reflection of America itself.

‘It is a reflection of our character, seen not only those who are buried here but in the caretakers who watch over them.’

Obama said that ‘a grateful nation’ thanks these fallen men and women.

He said: ‘Most Americans don’t fully see, don’t fully understand, the sacrifice made by the one per cent who serve in the military.

‘Few know what it’s like to take a bullet for a buddy, or knowing that he or she took one for you.

‘But our gold star families, our military families, our veterans, know this. I see that their hearts are still broken, but still so full of love.’

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